• Procurement planning, evaluation reports and contract management

    Effective planning at the project initiation stage, quality evaluation processes, and effective contract management post-contract award are critical to facilitating successful contract delivery.

    Procurement Planning

    Procurement planning and adoption of sound procurement practices lead to consistently better value for money; higher quality project and service delivery; and reduced risks to the agency.  Procurement planning involves consulting key stakeholders to define requirements, analysing how the supply market works, assessing risks and ultimately defining the best procurement strategy to meet the agency's business needs.

    However, the scale and scope of research, analysis and planning should be proportionate to the importance of the procurement to the agency, the level of risk inherent in the procurement and its value. 

    A procurement plan must be developed for procurements with a total estimated value of $5 million and above except where the Accountable Authority decides that the plan would be of no benefit due to the nature of that procurement. 

    Evaluation Reports

    Appropriate records should be kept of the decision making process leading up to the award of a contract.  This decision making process should be recorded in an evaluation report for all written quotes and public tenders.

    An evaluation report must be developed for procurements with a total estimated value of $5 million, including those contracts established through the use of a Common Use Arrangement, (CUA) except where the CUA Buyers Guide states otherwise.

    Contract Management Plans

    All contract managers should have a good knowledge of the operation and performance of the contracts under their responsibility in order to enhance contract outcomes.

    Contract management is an integral part of the procurement cycle.  A contract management plan assists contract managers to properly manage contracts by addressing transition management, performance monitoring and by helping to ensure that both parties fulfil their commercial and contractual commitments. 

    Contract management plans should be developed for all medium to high risk contracts.  A public authority should ensure that contracts are managed in accordance with the contract management plan and that plans are kept current.

    A contract management plan must be developed for procurements with a total estimated value of $5 million and above except where the Accountable Authority decides:

    • the purchase is a one-off good and/or service that is not the subject of a period contract arrangement; or
    • that the plan would be of no benefit due to the nature of that procurement.

    A contract management plan must also be developed for procurements from a Common Use Arrangement, if that purchase is valued at $5 million and above, unless the CUA Buyers Guide says otherwise.

    Contract Variations

    Good contract managers understand that their contract should reflect any agreed changes to the contract scope.  These changes should be recorded in writing and the contract management plan amended if required.

    State Tender Review Committee and the Community Services Procurement Review Committee

    Where procurements are valued at $5 million and above, including procurements from a Common Use Arrangement, a partially exempt public authority [1] must submit:

    • a procurement plan[2];
    • an evaluation report; and
    • a contract management plan[3]

    to the State Tender Review Committee or the Community Services Procurement Review Committee (the latter when procuring using the Delivering Community Services in Partnership Policy).

    Where contract variations[4] are valued at $5 million and above (either individually or cumulatively), a contract variation memo must be submitted to the State Tender Review Committee or the Community Services Procurement Review Committee, as applicable.  This includes contract variations made to contracts established under a Common Use Arrangement (CUA), unless the CUA Buyers Guide says otherwise.

    The Executive Director, Government Procurement, Department of Finance may, in exceptional circumstances, approve exemptions from any of the documents, above, being submitted to the relevant Committee.

    For assistance in procurement planning and management, public authorities should refer to the Department of Finance, Government Procurement, Procurement Practice Guide.

    Footnotes:

    [1] A public authority with a partial exemption from section 19(1) of the State Supply Commission Act 1991.

    [2] Except where the Accountable Authority decides that the plan would be of no benefit due to the nature of that procurement.

    [3] Except where the Accountable Authority decides: the purchase is a one-off good and/or service that is not the subject of a period contract arrangement; or that the plan would be of no benefit due to the nature of that procurement.

    [4] A 'variation' is defined as any variation in contract spend that exceeds the total contract value or estimated contract value recorded on TendersWA at the point of the award of the Contract.